Minorities and global health

Helena Nordenstedt presents the Global Health Framework, which can help you to understand how income is related to health. Basically, low income countries tend to have a lower life expectancy than countries in higher income levels.

She shows that minority groups within countries (in all income levels) generally have a lower life expectancy than the rest of the population, but as the countries get richer and healthier, the health of the minorities also improve.

She also shows that there is no minority group in middle income and high income countries that has a life expectancy lower than the average in poor countries.

 

US health spending

The spending data comes from WHO[12]. The comparison between US spending and spending in other capitalist countries on Level 4 comes from OECD[1], a study named “Why Is Health Spending in the United States So High? ” It concludes that costs in the US health-care system are higher across the board, but in particular costs of outpatient care and administration; and that this does not lead to better outcomes, because the system is not incentivizing doctors to spend time with the patients most in need of care.

***

This page is under construction. We are working on it (and a lot of other pages too). If you need this particular page urgently, you can always drop us a line, and we might be able to squeeze it to the top of our prio list…

Contact us at [email protected]

Japanese: このページを含め、多くの出典ページは現在改稿中です。このページの情報がいますぐ知りたいという方は [email protected] までご連絡ください。

Updated Gapminder World Poster 2015!

Thanks to all Gapminders on Facebook for feedback on the previous version!

We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!

countries_health_wealth_2016_v15

Click here to download the PDF file. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in December 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

It’s clear in this chart that there is are not two groups of countries. There is no developing vs. developed, rich vs. poor. Instead of labeling countries in two groups, we suggest using the 4 income levels marked on the chart. Remember that next year the countries may change their positions, so let’s not label them, but mention the levels in which they find themselves now.

No country on level 4 has really short life expectancy, and no country on level 1 have long life expectancy. Most people live in the middle, on levels 2 and 3. There are huge differences in life expectancy in the middle, depending on how income is used.

 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

You can find a free interactive version of this chart at www.gapminder.org/tools, in which you can play historic time series & compare other indicators.

 

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

 

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

 

Gapminder World Poster 2015

Here is the new Gapminder World Poster showing the health and wealth of all countries in 2015!

UPDATE:
We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!
See the update here

 

countries_health_wealth_2016_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in September 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. Or put differently; in countries with longer lives, GDP per capita is higher. The connection between health and wealth doesn’t tell us which comes first. But one thing is clear: there are not two groups of countries, despite what many people think. Dividing the countries into two groups, developing vs. developed, is extremely misleading.

Labels make it easier to talk about groups of countries. But the labels should be relevant. So we recommend using the 4 income levels marked on the top of the chart. It’s better practice to divide the world into 4 groups and it’s better to label the levels and not the countries, because next year the members in each group will change.

Notice how none of the countries on level 4 have really short life expectancy. And none of the countries on level 1 have long life expectancies. Most people live in countries on level 2 and 3, where there are huge differences in life expectancy. For example Vietnam and Nigeria are both on level 2. Most people live in middle income levels 2 and 3 where there is a wide range in lifespans, depending on differences in how the income is used to save lives.

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

Gapminder World Poster 2013

This chart compares Life Expectancy & GDP per capita of 182 nations in the year 2013. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. No high income countries have really short life expectancy, and no low income countries have very long life expectancy. Still, there is a huge difference in life expectancy between countries on the same income level. Most people live in Middle Income countries where difference in lifespan is huge between countries; depending on how income is distributed and how it is used.

gapminder_world_2013_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. The chart was produced in November 2014 and revised in March 2015.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), Jan 14 2015, with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME 2014, available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/le/, Jan 14 2015.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision. 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at www.gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

Gapminder World 2012 (PDF)

Quick links
PDF-file (suitable for print)
Documentation (suitable for print)

About this Chart

The Gapminder World Map was produced by Gapminder in August 2012, with the latest available data (2011). The chart compares all UN members and other countries and territories with more than 1 million people, by income and health.

Gapminder World 2010 (PDF)

Quick links
PDF-file (suitable for print)
Documentation
Share
About this Chart

The Gapminder World Map was produced by Gapminder in August 2012, with the latest available data (2011). The chart compares all UN members and other countries and territories with more than 1 million people, by income and health.

200 years that changed the world

Switch off (and on) subtitles by clicking the icon in the bottom right corner of the video player.

About this Video

It was the last 200 years that changed the world. In 1809 all countries of the world had a life expectancy under 40 years and an income per person less than 3000 dollar per year. Since then the world has changed but it was not until after the second world war that most countries started to improve.

For the first time, Gapminder can now visualize change in life expectancy and income per person over the last two centuries. In this Gapminder video, Hans Rosling shows you how all the countries of the world have developed since 1809 – 200 years ago.

The interactive animations and corresponding documentation are freely available at www.gapminder.org/world.

Download

Download video in high resolution here.

Related content

200 year time series in Gapminder World
Teacher Guide: 200 years that changed the world

Breast Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Breast Cancer is the most common form of cancer among women. Unlike cervical cancer, breast cancer is more common in rich countries than in low- and middle-income countries and also tends to increase as a country gets richer.

But with higher income there are also better chances to save women who get cancer. The data from IARC, now presented in Gapminder World shows how breast cancer has increased in countries like Sweden, but also how death rates are falling. Today, most of the women who get breast cancer in Sweden will survive.

The challenge is to make sure that also low- and middle-income countries will be able to afford treatment for its women when the number of breast cancer now will increase, as they continue to develop.

Related content

See Breast Cancer graphs in Gapminder World.
– – – – – – – – – – – – –
Data source: The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

Cervical Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Cervical cancer is common among middle-aged women.  It is caused by a sexually transmitted papillomavirus that causes a lesion in the lower part of the uterus that, in some women, can develop into cancer.

By introducing screening test, so called ”pap smear test”, many countries have managed to reduce the number of women affected by cervical cancer dramatically, and by doing so saving thousands of women every year.

Unlike some other cancers (e.g. breast cancer) cervical cancer is decreasing with higher income.

In this video Hans Rosling compare two nordic countries, Denmark and Norway that, at different times, introduced the Pap smear screening and the effect it has had on the number of women who got cancer.

Related content

See Cervical Cancer graphs in Gapminder World:
Denmark and Norway
Cervical cancer and income in the whole world.