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Everyone lives on Dollar Street

Imagine all people in the World lived along one long street. And imagine all houses were sorted by income. The poorest to the left. The richest to the right. What would it look like, and where would you live?

Back in 2003 Anna got obsessed with the idea of making such systematic photo documentation of all common items from homes all over the world, to see what everyday life looks like, with different incomes. Her project launched in 2016 with more than 300 homes from 52 different countries documented. Anna was then invited to present it at TED in Vancouver in April 2017, and now you can watch her talk here. (Or scroll down to see how you can contribute to this unique free image bank, by adding more homes from more countries).

 

Even if we have 300+ families documented, we want more. Dollar Street is a one of a kind image bank of everyday life across the world. It uses photos as data to show what life looks like on all different income levels. If you like to contribute with more homes, please contact info@gapminder.org  (All images are free to use, under Creative Common License CC BY 4.0.).

Using photos as data to understand how people live

Dollar Street is the brainchild of Anna Rosling where she uses photos as data to make everyday life on different income all over the World easy to understand! It is a free website with 300+ homes from 52 countries ordered by income. Imagine all people in the World lived on the same street, the poorest to the left and the richest to the right. Where would you live?

Do you want better coverage in your country? Welcome to add your home to the street – you can find the resources here.

Aha! Now I get how everybody lives!

Dollar Street is a visual framework created by Anna Rosling Rönnlund, co-founder of Gapminder, for understanding how everybody lives across the world.

It combines photos of the everyday lives of families in more than 52 countries with income data to provide a fact-based worldview that everyone can understand.

Happy birthday Dollar Street!

Happy Birthday Dollar Street 1st Year

Today is Dollar Street’s first birthday. And what a year it has been!

Dollar Street has grown from 160 to more than 260 homes.

And it is now available in English, Spanish and Swedish!

Our mission has been to show how people around the world really live. And Dollar Street has received an overwhelming response! A lot of teachers, public speakers, researchers and students have used Dollar Street to better understand how people eat, brush their teeth and sleep on different income levels across the globe. Country stereotypes have simply fallen apart in front of our eyes; at the same income level, there are a lot of similarities in how people live, independently of their culture or religion.

Thanks to our Dollar Street photographer, we now have 100 new homes; a total of 260 homes in 50 countries, from the hills of Peru in South America, to the furthest Islands of Papua New Guinea along the Pacific Ocean.

Guispe de Tenori's Family, Peru

Guispe de Tenori’s, Peru
Geenkai's family, Papua New Guinea

Geenkai’s, Papua New Guinea

Our goal is to have at least 10 homes per country. Volunteer with your home or become a Dollar Street photographer (just like these fantastic folks). Or maybe you prefer to help translating Dollar Street to more languages? Welcome to join us! Please sign up here.

This year Dollar Street has been travelling the world. It has been presented in classrooms and at meetings and conferences in several countries including Sweden, Spain, U.S., Austria, South Africa, Canada and Germany. Some other highlights are articles in Business Insider, Fast Company and BuzzFeed and winning the Fast Company World Changing Ideas Award (category: Photography and Visualization). Last but not least, Dollar Street made it to TED! The TED Talk is coming out soon, stay tuned!

Finally, we would send our warmest hugs to all the families who generously welcomed us into their homes. Without you there would be no Dollar Street! Thank you!

Now, for the coming years, let’s make Dollar Street even better. Together.

Yours sincerely,

Dollar Street Logo

Anna & the Dollar Street team

Updated Gapminder World Poster 2015!

Thanks to all Gapminders on Facebook for feedback on the previous version!

We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!

countries_health_wealth_2016_v15

Click here to download the PDF file. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in December 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

It’s clear in this chart that there is are not two groups of countries. There is no developing vs. developed, rich vs. poor. Instead of labeling countries in two groups, we suggest using the 4 income levels marked on the chart. Remember that next year the countries may change their positions, so let’s not label them, but mention the levels in which they find themselves now.

No country on level 4 has really short life expectancy, and no country on level 1 have long life expectancy. Most people live in the middle, on levels 2 and 3. There are huge differences in life expectancy in the middle, depending on how income is used.

 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

You can find a free interactive version of this chart at www.gapminder.org/tools, in which you can play historic time series & compare other indicators.

 

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

 

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

 

Gapminder World Poster 2015

Here is the new Gapminder World Poster showing the health and wealth of all countries in 2015!

UPDATE:
We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!
See the update here

 

countries_health_wealth_2016_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in September 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. Or put differently; in countries with longer lives, GDP per capita is higher. The connection between health and wealth doesn’t tell us which comes first. But one thing is clear: there are not two groups of countries, despite what many people think. Dividing the countries into two groups, developing vs. developed, is extremely misleading.

Labels make it easier to talk about groups of countries. But the labels should be relevant. So we recommend using the 4 income levels marked on the top of the chart. It’s better practice to divide the world into 4 groups and it’s better to label the levels and not the countries, because next year the members in each group will change.

Notice how none of the countries on level 4 have really short life expectancy. And none of the countries on level 1 have long life expectancies. Most people live in countries on level 2 and 3, where there are huge differences in life expectancy. For example Vietnam and Nigeria are both on level 2. Most people live in middle income levels 2 and 3 where there is a wide range in lifespans, depending on differences in how the income is used to save lives.

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

See Gaps within US

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See which state of US has the highest unemployment rate over the last 3 decades.

Immigrants
See which state of US is the most attractive to foreign immigrants in 2005.

South was poorer, but not any longer
See development of all states of US from 1929 to 2006.

Videos

Imagine all people in the World lived along one long street. And imagine all houses were sorted by income. The poorest to the left. The richest to the right. What would it look like, and where would you live? Back in 2003 Anna got obsessed with the idea of making such systematic photo documentation of […]

Dollar Street is a visual framework created by Anna Rosling Rönnlund, co-founder of Gapminder, for understanding how everybody lives across the world. It combines photos of the everyday lives of families in more than 52 countries with income data to provide a fact-based worldview that everyone can understand.

In this TED Talk Hans Rosling presents the results of our public surveys that shows that people don’t know key aspects of global development. And Ola Rosling shows that this has nothing to do with intelligence. It’s a problem of factual knowledge. Facts don’t come naturally. Drama and opinions do. Factual knowledge has to be learned. So Ola teachers 4 […]

The change from large to small families reflects dramatic changes in peoples lives. In this TEDx video Hans Rosling talks about how this change plays out in Sweden, Singapore and in his own life.


Helena Nordenstedt presents the Global Health Framework, which can help you to understand how income is related to health. Basically, low income countries tend to have a lower life expectancy than countries in higher income levels. She shows that minority groups within countries (in all income levels) generally have a lower life expectancy than the rest […]

Dollar Street is the brainchild of Anna Rosling where she uses photos as data to make everyday life on different income all over the World easy to understand! It is a free website with 300+ homes from 52 countries ordered by income. Imagine all people in the World lived on the same street, the poorest to the […]

Explaining the global vaccination programs is NOT a party-killer! It’s a Party Trick! About This is Party Trick #1 in a series of Demographic Party Tricks, produced by the Gapminder Foundation: A Swedish Non-Profit promoting a fact-based worldview. In this film Hans asks the question — What percent of children get the basic vaccines? In […]

Is there a relation between religion, sex and the number of babies per woman?

What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine.

Hans Rosling uses Gapminder bubbles in CNN Global Public Square to show US converge with other countries.

A one-hour documentary broadcast by BBC, where Hans Rosling says there’s nothing boring about stats, and then goes on to prove it.

Many countries are making good progress towards MDG4 and it’s time to stop talking about Sub-Saharan Africa as one place.

Hans Rosling explains why ending poverty is crucial to stop population growth.

A 55-minute documentary about Hans Rosling’s life & thoughts.

From a talk by Hans Rosling at the Prince Mahidol Award conference 2010. Produced by health metric network.

Hans Rosling predicts the exact date India and China will have the same income per person as the US.

The Internet community Reddit.com got to ask questions to Hans Rosling. Here is his answers.

TED-talk at the US State Department. Global trends over 200 years, the development of HIV/AIDS and how China is catching up.

United Kingdom was a leading nation of the world. See UK’s  journey to present time and how China is closing in.

25 years of the HIV epidemic in easily understood graphics. Showing the big differences within Africa.

Media hype and neglect, on two killer diseases.

Human Rights & Democracy data correlates poorly with progress in Health and Wealth.

200 years of history in 4.5 minutes. Let Hans Rosling guide you through the developments of the last two centuries.

Iceland towards gender equity in lung cancer.

Prostate cancer, most common in the US. Overdiagnosis or not?

Breast Cancer increases with income, but so does the chances of saving women with cancer.

Vaccination, but not high-income, can prevent liver cancer.

Higher income increases, but could also help cure colon cancer!

Stomach cancer, highest in middle income countries.

Cervical Cancer can be prevented and treated. Today it is most common among women in low-income countries.

Is Shanghai healthier than New York? And how do Washington D.C. and Mumbai rank?

Swedish students say: “They can never live like us”. It is time to rethink!

Bangladesh, Brazil, and Egypt reduce child mortality faster than Sweden ever did!

Global Health in a new world. (Från Svenska Läkaresällskapets 200-årsjubileum.)

The presentation at the TED-conference in 2006, seen by millions over the internet.

Hans Rosling’s 2007 TED-speech makes the seemingly impossible possible.

Nearly 10 million children under five die every year. How can child mortality be cut by two thirds by 2015?

A lecture from Google Zeitgeist 2007. Hans Rosling uses Gapminder World to shed light on differences in the way we live.

The urbanization will continue but can slum be made history?

In swedish: Kan schimpanser bättre? Gör det mest grundläggande testet i Global Hälsa!

CO2 emissions in USA and China compared. How to produce electricity cheaper than from coal.

To have a fair chance in life, everyone needs public services. Good information is needed in order to provide good public service.

What’s the difference between Chile, Cuba and the USA?

OIL, HIV, CO2, USD. – Four topics, four acronyms. Full lecture with Hans Rosling from 2008.

Have you heard about the miracle that has happened in Bangladesh? – Watch the video to find out.

The eradication of poverty is within human range.

Human Development from 1960 to 2001.

In focus: Life Expectancy and Income

The urban challenge.

Hans Rosling shows the last 40 years of development of urbanization.

300 years of Swedish history.

How economic growth, public health and sexual rights have changed.

Income Distribution, 2003

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Compare income distribution within or between countries. Based on data from Professor Xavier Sala-i-Martin.

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