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Updated Gapminder World Poster 2015!

Thanks to all Gapminders on Facebook for feedback on the previous version!

We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!

countries_health_wealth_2016_v15

Click here to download the PDF file. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in December 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

It’s clear in this chart that there is are not two groups of countries. There is no developing vs. developed, rich vs. poor. Instead of labeling countries in two groups, we suggest using the 4 income levels marked on the chart. Remember that next year the countries may change their positions, so let’s not label them, but mention the levels in which they find themselves now.

No country on level 4 has really short life expectancy, and no country on level 1 have long life expectancy. Most people live in the middle, on levels 2 and 3. There are huge differences in life expectancy in the middle, depending on how income is used.

 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

You can find a free interactive version of this chart at www.gapminder.org/tools, in which you can play historic time series & compare other indicators.

 

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

 

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

 

Gapminder World Poster 2015

Here is the new Gapminder World Poster showing the health and wealth of all countries in 2015!

UPDATE:
We have updated the graph with the latest Life Expectancy numbers from IHME!
See the update here

 

countries_health_wealth_2016_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. This chart was produced in September 2016.

This chart shows the Life Expectancy and Income of 182 nations in the year 2015. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. Or put differently; in countries with longer lives, GDP per capita is higher. The connection between health and wealth doesn’t tell us which comes first. But one thing is clear: there are not two groups of countries, despite what many people think. Dividing the countries into two groups, developing vs. developed, is extremely misleading.

Labels make it easier to talk about groups of countries. But the labels should be relevant. So we recommend using the 4 income levels marked on the top of the chart. It’s better practice to divide the world into 4 groups and it’s better to label the levels and not the countries, because next year the members in each group will change.

Notice how none of the countries on level 4 have really short life expectancy. And none of the countries on level 1 have long life expectancies. Most people live in countries on level 2 and 3, where there are huge differences in life expectancy. For example Vietnam and Nigeria are both on level 2. Most people live in middle income levels 2 and 3 where there is a wide range in lifespans, depending on differences in how the income is used to save lives.

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2015 Revision.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

INCOME LEVELS: Gapminder uses four income groups which roughly correspond to those used by the World Bank, with minor differences. The World Bank uses the indicator GNI per capita in US dollars, while Gapminder uses the indicator GDP per capita in PPP (constant 2011 international $).

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

 

Gapminder World Poster 2013

This chart compares Life Expectancy & GDP per capita of 182 nations in the year 2013. Each bubble is a country. Size is population. Color is region.

People live longer in countries with a higher GDP per capita. No high income countries have really short life expectancy, and no low income countries have very long life expectancy. Still, there is a huge difference in life expectancy between countries on the same income level. Most people live in Middle Income countries where difference in lifespan is huge between countries; depending on how income is distributed and how it is used.

gapminder_world_2013_v8

Click here to download. Suitable for print. The chart was produced in November 2014 and revised in March 2015.

DATA SOURCES

The chart shows last year’s numbers because it takes time for all countries to collect and publish the latest statistics.

INCOME DATA: World Bank’s GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $), Jan 14 2015, with a few additions by Gapminder. The x-axis uses a log-scale so that doubling incomes show the same distance on all levels.

LIFE EXPECTANCY: IHME 2014, available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/le/, Jan 14 2015.

POPULATION: UN World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision. 

INTERACTIVE TOOL

A free interactive version of this chart is available online at www.gapminder.org/tools, which lets you play historic time series & compare other indicators.

CC LICENSE

Our posters are freely available under Creative Commons Attribution License. Please copy, share, modify, integrate and even sell them, as long as you mention ”Based on a free chart from www.gapminder.org”.

Gapminder World 2012 (PDF)

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Documentation (suitable for print)

About this Chart

The Gapminder World Map was produced by Gapminder in August 2012, with the latest available data (2011). The chart compares all UN members and other countries and territories with more than 1 million people, by income and health.

Teacher’s guide: 200 years that changed the world

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Levels
Secondary school
Subjects
History, geography & social studies.

About the Lesson/Teacher’s guide

This teacher guide explains how you can use Gapminder World to lecture about global development from 1800 until today. For inspiration, you can watch a brief video-lecture with Hans Rosling here.

Key messages of the lecture

  • In 1800, income per person was low and life expectancy was very short in all countries.
  • Health is better everywhere today, even in the poorest countries.
  • Income is much higher in most, but not all, countries today.
  • The income and health gaps between countries are larger today.
  • Most people today live in “middle income” countries

Teacher’s guide: Global Development Quiz

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Levels
Secondary school
Subjects
History & social studies.

About the Quiz/Teacher’s guide

Use this quiz to introduce subjects such as global health, the effects of HIV, population growth and carbon dioxide emissions, or as starting point to discuss what development is. What do the indicators in these quizzes say about the world?
Several of the questions illustrate the so-called demographic transition: most countries in the world have gone from having many children and high mortality to few children and low mortality.

The quiz uses Gapminder World. All you’ll need is the Internet, a computer and a projector. Download the PDF and get going!

Gapminder HIV Chart

About this Chart

Gapminder HIV Chart 2009 is a map for print. It may be redistributed under a CreativeCommons license.
The size of the country bubbles in the chart represents the Number of people living with HIV. The y-axis and x-axis shows Adult HIV prevalence rate and Income per person, respectively.
Read more about HIV Trends in the blog: “See new surprising trends in HIV”

Downloads

Gapminder Slides

Download Gapminder’s slides, free to modify and use in any way you like!

Here are the slides used in our public presentations and TED talks.

Download Gapminder slides

Gapminder Tools Offline

Gapminder Offline Screenshot

This software allows you to show animated statistics from your own laptop.

You can use it without internet access
Updates automatically when new data is available

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Factfulness Posters

Put this on your wall to keep reminding yourself of the Factfulness rules of thumb.

Handouts & Lesson plans (PDF)

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Gapminder Card Game

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Levels
Secondary school
Subjects
History, geography & social studies.

About the Sorting Game

Students are given a number of “country cards”. They are asked to group/arrange the cards in a way that they think reflect the gaps in the world today. Afterwards they compare their arrangement with the “Gapminder World Map” graph.

Key messages of the exercise

This exercise helps students think about the gaps in the world today and helps challenge preconceived ideas about how the contemporary world looks. The exercise can also be used to stimulate an interest in using statistics to understand the world.