Progress in China, Bangladesh, and Vietnam

Progress in China, Bangladesh, and Vietnam. The Population Bomb, by Paul and Anne Ehrlich (1968), contributed to a widespread idea that Asia and Africa would never be able to feed their growing populations. The data on deaths from famines is from EM-DAT. The Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) produces maps of conflicts and poverty.

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Japanese: このページを含め、多くの出典ページは現在改稿中です。このページの情報がいますぐ知りたいという方は [email protected] までご連絡ください。

Asia’s rise, how and when (TEDIndia)

About this talk

Hans Rosling, at the first TED-conference in India, predicts when China and India will catch up with the United States in terms of income per person. He graphs global economic growth since 1858, depicting some of the main events using images and animated Gapminder charts.

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Let my dataset change your mindset


About this talk:
In the talk at the US State Department in the summer of 2009, Hans  Rosling showed the overall global trends in health and income over the last 200 years, the development of the HIV/AIDS-epidemic and how China is catching up on the richest countries.

It was also the 500th TED-talk of all times.


From TED:s webpage:
Talking at the US State Department this summer, Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. Look for new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.


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Crisis narrows China-UK gap

About this Video

200 years ago, United Kingdom was a leading nation of the world – both in regard to health and economy. In this video, Hans Rosling details UK’s 200-year journey, to present time, and also shows that China, in the coming five years, will narrow the gap to UK faster than ever.

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See UK and China in Gapminder World.

200 years that changed the world

Switch off (and on) subtitles by clicking the icon in the bottom right corner of the video player.

About this Video

It was the last 200 years that changed the world. In 1809 all countries of the world had a life expectancy under 40 years and an income per person less than 3000 dollar per year. Since then the world has changed but it was not until after the second world war that most countries started to improve.

For the first time, Gapminder can now visualize change in life expectancy and income per person over the last two centuries. In this Gapminder video, Hans Rosling shows you how all the countries of the world have developed since 1809 – 200 years ago.

The interactive animations and corresponding documentation are freely available at www.gapminder.org/world.

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Download video in high resolution here.

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200 year time series in Gapminder World
Teacher Guide: 200 years that changed the world

Shanghai, New York, Mumbai

About this Video

See the development of three centers of trade, Shanghai, New York and Mumbai.
Also, a comparison of the capitals: Beijing, Washington, D.C. and New Delhi.
And finally, a note from Professor Rosling on how one can measure the progress of President Obama’s intentions to improve the health system of the US.

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Gaps within China, India, US

See "Gaps" within each country

After several months of testing, a new service of Gapminder is now available. 

During the process of development, different geographical regions within the same country could have very different speed of development, and this may cause significant internal gaps. By using statistics animation technology, these gaps could be visualized and the change over time could also be displayed. For example, you could compare the development of Utah from US and Shanghai from China during the last 3 decades: Utah vs Shanghai

We would strongly recommended that you read the “PDF tutorial” and the “Caveat” to the left of the graph first.