Breast Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Breast Cancer is the most common form of cancer among women. Unlike cervical cancer, breast cancer is more common in rich countries than in low- and middle-income countries and also tends to increase as a country gets richer.

But with higher income there are also better chances to save women who get cancer. The data from IARC, now presented in Gapminder World shows how breast cancer has increased in countries like Sweden, but also how death rates are falling. Today, most of the women who get breast cancer in Sweden will survive.

The challenge is to make sure that also low- and middle-income countries will be able to afford treatment for its women when the number of breast cancer now will increase, as they continue to develop.

Related content

See Breast Cancer graphs in Gapminder World.
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Data source: The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)

Cervical Cancer Statistics

About this Video

Cervical cancer is common among middle-aged women.  It is caused by a sexually transmitted papillomavirus that causes a lesion in the lower part of the uterus that, in some women, can develop into cancer.

By introducing screening test, so called ”pap smear test”, many countries have managed to reduce the number of women affected by cervical cancer dramatically, and by doing so saving thousands of women every year.

Unlike some other cancers (e.g. breast cancer) cervical cancer is decreasing with higher income.

In this video Hans Rosling compare two nordic countries, Denmark and Norway that, at different times, introduced the Pap smear screening and the effect it has had on the number of women who got cancer.

Related content

See Cervical Cancer graphs in Gapminder World:
Denmark and Norway
Cervical cancer and income in the whole world.

Debunking myths about the “third world”

About this talk

You’ve never seen data presented like this. Hans Rosling’s presentation at the TED-conference in 2006 has been seen by millions over the internet, at TED’s web-page, at Google Video or Youtube.

With the urgency of a sportscaster,  Hans Rosling debunks myths about the so-called “developing world” using the animation software that powers Gapminder World.

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Flash-presentation used.

The seemingly impossible is possible

About this talk

This year, 2007, Hans Rosling’s TED-speech focused on making the seemingly impossible possible.

The Trendalyzer software (recently acquired by Google) turns complex global trends into lively animations, making decades of data pop. Asian countries, as colorful bubbles, float across the grid – toward better national health and wealth.

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Related Content

Go to the speach from 2006.

Reducing Child Mortality

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWI_1QoQ9aM

About

Nearly 10 million children under five die every year. Almost 90% of all child deaths are attributable to just six conditions: neonatal causes, pneumonia, diarrhoea, malaria, measles, and HIV/AIDS.

The aim (Millenium Development Goal 4) is to cut child mortality by two thirds by 2015.
How can this be achieved?
Which countries make sufficient progress?
And by which rate did a country like Norway reduce its child mortality the last 100 years?

Watch Gapminder Video #11 to understand the background and the current status of a Millenium Development Goal.

Related content

Clickable presentation

Health, Money & Sex in Sweden

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18MZmVDv7uo

About this Gapminder video

In the first Gapminder video from Gapminder, Professor Hans Rosling shows how economic growth, public health and sexual rights have changed in Sweden during 300 years.

In only 6 minutes he shows life expectancy and GDP per capita of Sweden from 1709 to 2004. With trendalyzer graphics he compares historic Sweden with countries of today. 300 years of Swedish progress covers today’s disparity from Sierra Leone to Japan. Wheras education of midwives started in 1709 it was only in the 1970’es that family planning was included in their training. Sexual rights came late in Sweden compared to progress in health and wealth.